What Happened to the 3 Wonders of the Ancient World?

The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World were like the superstar attractions of their time – stunning structures known for their beauty and impressive engineering. Think of them as the ancient version of “must-see” destinations. Different ancient authors had their lists, but the one we talk about today has become the go-to list of famous ancient sites in the Eastern Mediterranean.

It includes iconic places like the Great Pyramid of Giza, the Mausoleum at Halicarnassus, the Temple of Artemis in Ephesus, the Statue of Zeus in Olympia, the Colossus of Rhodes, Alexandria’s Pharos or Great Lighthouse, and the legendary Hanging Gardens of Babylon. These wonders still leave us in awe today, celebrating the incredible craftsmanship of ancient civilizations.

The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World

Picture this: a long time ago during the Hellenistic period, Greek folks began to explore places like the Mediterranean and the Middle East. These were exciting times, and as they traveled, they needed guides to show them around. They started writing down their adventures and listing the amazing stuff they found, like impressive monuments.

At first, they just called these places “theamata,” which basically means must-see spots. But as time went on, they changed it to “thaumata,” which means wonders. These wonders were the jaw-dropping places that left everyone amazed. And guess what? We still talk about them today because they’re incredible and important.

Over time people decided to have a standard list of seven wonders but everyone had their own special favorites based on where they traveled. So, there were different lists. Some folks liked the huge walls of Babylon while others thought the Lighthouse of Alexandria was cooler. And as time passed, some even thought the temple of Solomon in Jerusalem was the best. These different ideas make the stories about these wonders more interesting and give us lots to talk about.

Travel back in time, and you’ll find folks like Herodotus and Callimachus trying to list the Seven Wonders. But guess what? We lost their lists over time. The list we know today as the Seven Wonders comes from Philo of Byzantium and Antipater of Sidon.

They made sure the stories of these ancient wonders were passed down through the years, and that’s why we still know and talk about them today.

Think of it this way: the Seven Wonders, are fantastic, but if someone from a different part of the world made the list it might have different wonders, on it. We have another article about some other amazing places. So if you ever wondered why famous places like the Great Wall of China or the Colosseum, in Rome, aren’t on this list here’s why.

The Colosseum wasn’t even built when they made this list and the Great Wall was just too far away for the Greek travelers who picked these wonders. It’s a reminder that there are incredible places all around the world each with its own special story.

1. Great Pyramid of Giza

The Great Pyramid of Giza in Egypt is super old like 4500 years old. It’s the only one left from the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. This massive tomb, built for a pharaoh named Khufu is 146.5 meters tall.

They used more than 2.3 million stone blocks from different places to make it. Plus, it used to have a smooth white coating that made it look different from today. It’s like a giant time traveler, showing us how amazing ancient people were at building incredible things.

You know the big pyramid in Giza, right? Well, it’s not alone. The kings in Pharaoh Khufu’s family, like his son and grandson, built their own big tombs next to it. When you look at all three together, it’s like a giant man-made mountain. People have been visiting this cool place for ages.

The big pyramid also had two temples next to where the king and queen were buried. And, of course, you can’t forget about the famous Sphinx statue. All of this together is called the Giza Pyramid complex, and it’s full of history and amazing things to see.

The kings in Pharaoh Khufu’s family like his son and grandson built their own big tombs next to it. When you look at all three together it’s like a giant man-made mountain. People have been visiting this cool place for ages. The big pyramid also had two temples next to where the king and queen were buried. And of course, you can’t forget about the famous Sphinx statue. All of this together is called the Giza Pyramid complex and it’s full of history and amazing things to see.

2. Hanging Gardens of Babylon

The Hanging Gardens of Babylon, you know, those amazing gardens? Some people think King Nebuchadnezzar II built them around 605-652 BCE. Others say a queen named Semiramis made them, so they call them Semiramis’ Gardens too. These gardens were like a bunch of flower-filled terraces stacked on top of each other. The coolest thing about them, besides being enormous, is that they watered themselves. We’re not exactly sure how they did it, but experts have some pretty smart ideas about how ancient engineers might have done the trick.

Let’s break it down in simple terms. The Hanging Gard

ens of Babylon were said to be a gift from King Nebuchadnezzar II to his wife Amtis of Media, who missed the green mountains of her homeland. The king had these huge artificial mountains made with lots of plants and trees to make his wife feel at home.

Now, some folks argue whether these gardens were even real. One idea, suggested by a scholar named Stephanie Dalley, is that they might have been built by someone else, not Nebuchadnezzar. They think the gardens could have been made by Sennacherib in a place called Nineveh. The mix-up might’ve happened because Nineveh was sometimes called the New Babylon. Plus, we have better proof for Sennacherib’s gardens, like old aqueducts.

But no matter who built them, these amazing gardens got wrecked by an earthquake in the 1st century CE.

3. Statue of Zeus at Olympia

Long ago, there was a super famous statue of Zeus, who was like the head honcho of all the gods. A super-talented sculptor named Phidias made this statue about 2,500 years ago. What made it extra special was that it was crafted from a mix of shiny gold and ivory.

The statue showed Zeus sitting on a fancy throne, holding a tiny statue of a winged goddess called Nike and a cool scepter with an eagle on top. This statue was no joke; it was colossal, nearly 12.5 meters tall! People used to have a laugh, saying that if Zeus ever stood up, he’d bump his hehttps://soundcloudtomp3.net/unmasking-the-shocking-truth-the-deadly-infestation-of-misinformation-in-our-modern-world/ad on the ceiling.

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It lived in a place called the Temple of Zeus in Olympia. To make sure it stayed in good shape, there was a clever setup with a pool of oil in front of it. This oil helped control the moisture and kept the statue looking fantastic.

A long time ago, there was a Roman emperor named Caligula. He had this strange idea. He wanted to take a statue of Zeus to Rome and put his own face on it instead of Zeus’s face! But, before he could do that, Caligula died in 41 CE.
That was a bit lucky for the statue because it got to stick around a bit longer. Later, the statue was moved to a place called Constantinople. But, unfortunately, in the fifth century CE, there was a big fire, and the statue was destroyed.